Labels

Text labels are added to maps with Labels components. To add labels to a map we create a labels component and add it as a layer to the map. We can add the text for labels manually in a labels component, or we can have Manifold automatically create labels by deriving them from objects in a drawing. When labels are automatically created from objects in a drawing, Manifold will use the locations of the objects to place labels and can automatically create the text for those labels by using data rom the drawing's table.

 

A labels component contains information showing where all labels should be placed, the text they contain and how that text should be displayed, including the geometric shape of the label as well as formatting information such as style, font and colors to use.

 

Labels components may be opened in their own windows or used as layers in a map together with other components such as drawings and images. Except for the labels they contain, labels components are completely transparent and may be stacked as layers in maps to create whatever effect is desired.

 

images\sc_labels_stack_04.gif

 

For example, the map shown above consists of a drawing layer with two labels layers above it.

 

images\sc_labels_stack_01.gif

 

The drawing layer shows the shoreline of Europe.

 

images\sc_labels_stack_02.gif

 

One of the labels layers, called Land, is used to host labels indicating regions on land. Labels in this layer are formatted in the style seen above for Italy and Sicily. Text in this layer is boldfaced using Times Roman font in black foreground color.

 

Although normally layers labels are displayed within map windows, we can also open a labels component in a labels window as seen in the illustration above. Because the labels component is completely transparent except for the text labels it contains, we can see the default checkerboard background in this window. To show a solid background instead of the checkerboard pattern, open the Layers pane and click the Background layer on. If the labels component shows a solid background and we prefer the transparent checkerboard pattern, we can click the Background layer off in the layers pane.

 

images\sc_labels_stack_03.gif

 

A second labels layer, called Sea, is used to host labels indicating sea areas. Text in this layer is formatted using the MS Sans Serif font, boldfaced, in blue foreground color.

 

images\ill_labels_stack.gif

 

The composite effect seen in the map is like stacking two transparent sheets of labels layers above the drawing layer.

 

We can use many different labels layers to create labels in the map in whatever formatting is desired. The different layers may be clicked on and off, and can be controlled on a layer-by-layer basis.

 

Important Options for Labels Components

 

Manifold may be used in very many different types of applications, so Manifold provides many options for creating and working with labels. There are capabilities for working with labels manually, for having the system create labels automatically for us and for a combination of both manual and automatic labels. There are three main option choices when working with labels:

 

·      Bound or Unbound labels - Unbound labels are manually created in a free-form way. Bound labels are "bound" to a drawing because they are created automatically or semi-automatically from that drawing. Bound labels may be converted to unbound labels with the Labels - Unlink command at any time, but unbound labels cannot be converted to bound labels.

·      Synchronized or not synchronized - Bound labels can be synchronized so they automatically pop into existence or are deleted as objects in their parent drawing are created or deleted. Unbound labels have no connection to any drawing so this option does not apply to unbound labels.

·      Per-Label Format, On or Off - By default, the Format toolbar controls the appearance of all labels in a labels layer. Turning on per-label formatting makes it possible to independently set the format of individual labels. This is very convenient for some purposes but requires extra thought or better user organizational skills in some circumstances. Per-label formatting may be turned on or off at any time for any labels component using the Labels - Per-Label Format setting.

 

The choices we make within the above options allow us to specify how labels components behave in our application, ranging from an exclusively manual, label-by-label control over the placement and appearance of labels (using unbound labels with per-label formatting turned on), to fully automated creation and placement of labels (using synchronized bound labels with per-label formatting turned off) or any combination of manual and semi-automatic functionality in between.

 

Bound and Unbound Labels Components

 

Labels components may be bound or unbound. Unbound labels are manually created, and bound labels may be automatically created.

 

·      An unbound labels component is like a notepad where we can manually add whatever labels we want at whatever position we want. Unbound labels components may also be referred to as standalone labels components.

·      A bound labels component is automatically derived from a parent drawing using the positions of objects in the parent drawing to specify the positions of corresponding labels. A bound labels component is by default synchronized with its parent drawing. By default, there will be a label for every object in the drawing and each label will be located exactly at the same position as its parent object. Labels bound to lines will by default be aligned to follow those lines, even if the lines are curved lines

 

Although any labels component may be opened in its own window as well as being used as a layer within a map, unbound labels components are almost always used only within a map.

 

images\sc_labels_visual_context_02.gif

 

Because labels components are completely transparent except for the labels they contain, as seen above it is difficult to maintain visual orientation when an unbound labels component is opened in its own window unless some other objects can be seen. Unless other layers in a map provide a visual context for position and zoom level it is difficult to work with an unbound labels component on its own.

 

images\sc_labels_visual_context_01.gif

 

When a bound labels component is opened in its own window the objects in the parent drawing from which the labels are created will be shown in the background in light gray color as seen in the illustration above. This provides visual context for the labels and makes it easy to work with an unbound labels component either in its own labels component window or as a layer within a map.

 

A bound labels component may be converted to an unbound labels component by right clicking on the labels component in the project pane and choosing Unlink. The synchronization of a bound labels component to its parent drawing may be turned on or off. The position of label and its metric, that is, the geometric shape that defines that label (normally the location of a point or of a linear shape followed by the label) may be edited.

 

The Create Labels Dialog

 

New labels components are created with the Create Labels dialog.

 

images\dlg_create_labels_dialog_03.gif

 

There are three main ways of launching the Create Labels dialog:

 

·      In the main menu, use the File - Create - Labels command. This creates a new labels layer in the project pane.

·      Right click in the project pane, either on a drawing component or on an empty portion of the project pane and choose Create - Labels in the pop up context menu. This creates a new labels layer in the project pane.

·      When a map window is open, right click onto the layers tabs and choose Add - New Labels. This creates a new labels layer in the project pane and after the labels component is created it will be automatically added to the map as a layer.

 

The Create Labels dialog uses the following controls:

 

Name

Name to use for the new labels component.

Parent

Contains a list of all drawings in the project as well as a [None] option. Choose the name of a drawing as a Parent when creating a bound labels component. Choose [None] to create an unbound labels component.

Columns

Shows the column names and database type of each column in the parent drawing's table. Enabled when a drawing is chosen as a Parent.

Text

Text to use for the label. May contain a combination of user supplied text as well as the names of columns in [ ] brackets. Column names in brackets will be substituted with the value of that column for the object to which the label is bound. Enabled when a drawing is chosen as a Parent.

Automatically label new drawing objects

If checked, automatically create new labels when new objects are added to the parent drawing. Enabled when a drawing is chosen as a Parent. Checked by default. Labels components with this option checked are said to be synchronized with their parent drawing. See the Synchronized Labels topic.

Use per-label format

If checked, each label will be individually formatted. If not checked, labels will be formatted in accordance with the format toolbar for the labels component until they are selected to be individually formatted. Not checked by default. See the Formatting Individual Labels topic.

 

To create a labels component we can right click into the project pane and choose Create - Labels. This launches the Create Labels dialog.

 

images\dlg_create_labels_dialog_01.gif

 

If we right-clicked onto a blank portion of the project pane the Create Labels dialog will be launched with no Parent drawing specified by default and those portions of the dialog that would normally work with fields available in a parent drawing will not be enabled. Use this path, or choose [None] in the Parent box to create an unbound labels component.

 

images\dlg_create_labels_dialog_02.gif

 

On the other hand, if we wish to create a bound labels component we can right click onto a drawing in the project pane and then choose Create - Labels in the pop up context menu. In this case the Create Labels dialog will launch with the name of the drawing we right-clicked already loaded into the Parent box.

 

images\dlg_create_labels_dialog_03.gif

 

Those portions of the dialog that work with bound labels will be enabled. Use this path, or choose the name of a drawing in the Parent box to create a bound labels component.

 

To Create an Unbound Labels Component

 

1. Open the map window in which the labels component will be used.

2. Launch the Create Labels dialog, most conveniently by right clicking on a layer tab and choosing Add - New Labels.

3. In the Create Labels dialog, verify [None] is the choice in the Parent box and press OK.

4. Drag and drop the new labels component from the project pane into the map window. This adds the labels component to the map window as a layer. This step is not necessary if we created the labels layer by right clicking on a map layer tab and choosing Add - New Labels, as this method will automatically add the new labels component to the map after it is created.

5. Click on the labels layer tab to make it the active layer.

6. Click the Insert Label button.

7. Click in the map window wherever a label is to be added. In the Insert Label dialog, enter whatever text is desired.

8. Unclick the Insert Label button when finished adding labels.

9. Change the settings in the Format toolbar to change the appearance of the text.

 

The new unbound labels component will appear in the project pane at its own level and not indented underneath another component.

 

images\sc_labels_proj_unbound.gif

 

By opening the map window first and then using File - Create - Labels when the open map window is the active window, we automatically create the new labels component with a native projection that matches the map. Since labels components are almost always used only within map windows it makes sense to create them using a native projection that matches the projection in use in the map window.

 

To Create a Bound Labels Component

 

1. Using either File - Create or by right clicking in the project pane and choosing Create - Labels, launch the Create Labels dialog.

2. Choose the name of the parent drawing from the list in the Parent box.

3. Specify the text desired for the label in the Text pane, using fields from the Columns pane above if desired. Press OK.

4. Open the map, and drag and drop the new labels component from the project pane into the map.

5. Click on the labels component's layer tab in the map to make it the active layer and use the Format toolbar to change the appearance of the labels as desired.

 

The new bound labels component will appear in the project pane indented underneath its parent component.

 

images\sc_labels_proj_bound.gif

 

When creating a bound labels component the labels component will be created using the projection parameters for the parent drawing.

 

Labels Menu Commands

 

The Labels menu will appear in the main menu when a labels component is the active component.

 

Add

Appears when a labels layer in a map has the focus. Allows creating and adding a New Drawing, New Image or New Labels component to the map, as well as calling the Add Layers dialog to add or remove layers from existing components in the project pane.

Open Drawing

Open the parent drawing for this labels component. Enabled for bound labels only.

Open Table

Open the table for the parent drawing of this labels component. Enabled for bound labels only.

Text

Open the Text dialog to allow altering label text. Enabled for bound labels only.

Per-Label Format

Shows current state of and also toggles per-label formatting on and off for this labels component. See the Formatting Individual Labels topic.

Synchronized

Shows current state of and also toggles whether or not this labels component automatically creates a label for each new drawing object. Enabled for bound labels only. See the Synchronized Labels topic.

Unlink

Convert a bound labels component into an unbound labels component. Enabled for bound labels only.

 

Changing Label Text

 

To change the text of an unbound label, right click on the label and choose Edit from the context menu. In the Edit Label dialog change the text to whatever is desired.

 

To change the text used in bound labels, in the main menu choose Labels - Text. The Text dialog that is launched reproduces the column pane and the text pane from the Create - Labels dialog so that the text used for bound labels may be changed.

 

Creating Labels from Fields

 

Bound labels allow us to create automatically many labels at once by using text fields in tables associated with drawings. We do this by using the Edit - Create - Labels dialog to create a bound labels component that is derived from a particular drawing. See the Creating Labels from Fields topic.

 

Pasting Objects as Labels

 

If we copy objects from a drawing and paste them as labels, Manifold opens the Paste Labels dialog to allow us to specify how we want those labels to be created using the following controls:

 

Columns

Shows the column names and database type of each column in the parent drawing's table.

Text

Text to use for the label. May contain a combination of user supplied text as well as the names of columns in [ ] brackets. Column names in brackets will be substituted with the value of that column for the object to which the label is bound.

Link labels to drawing objects

If checked, create a bound labels component. The default is not checked so that an unbound labels component is created.

Automatically label new drawing objects

If checked, automatically create new labels when new objects are added to the parent drawing. Enabled only if the Link labels to drawing objects option is checked. Labels components with this option checked are said to be synchronized with their parent drawing. See the Synchronized Labels topic.

Use per-label format

If checked, each label will be individually formatted. If not checked, labels will be formatted in accordance with the format toolbar for the labels component until they are selected to be individually formatted. Not checked by default. See the Formatting Individual Labels topic.

 

The dialog allows us to use content from database fields even if the Link labels to drawing objects option is not checked. If it is not checked, the database field values will be substituted into the label text on a one-time basis to create unbound labels with that text. If it is checked, the database field values will be dynamically applied on a continuing basis to create bound labels using that text.

 

By default, the Automatically label new drawing objects option is off so that unsynchronized labels are created. This makes it possible to paste a subset of a drawing to create labels only for the pasted objects.

 

When pasting drawing objects to create labels, the labels component is created using the same projection as the originating drawing.

 

Labels and Projections

 

Labels components have projections just like drawings and other components.

 

·      A bound labels component always takes its projection from its parent drawing. A bound labels component cannot be re-projected into a projection different from its parent drawing. If the parent drawing is re-projected to a new projection, any labels components bound to that drawing will be re-projected as well into that new projection.

·      An unbound labels component has its projection defined based upon the circumstances of its creation. If some other component is open and has the focus the unbound labels component will be created using whatever projection that active component uses. If no other component has the focus, then the labels component will be created using the default Orthographic projection. Unbound labels components may be re-projected into whatever new projection is desired.

 

The above system is very similar to that used for assigning projections when new drawings or other components are created, with the exception that the projection of a bound labels component is always synchronized to the projection of its parent drawing.

 

Controlling Zoom Range for Labels

 

We can turn labels components on and off for display in maps the same way that drawing layers are turned on and off for display: use Zoom Ranges to set the zoom range over which the labels component should be displayed. Zoom ranges work only with projected labels components and do not work for layers components using a latitude / longitude, unprojected coordinate system.

 

This capability will often be used when creating labels components that contain lots of labels. The zoom range can be set so labels are visible only when zoomed far enough into the map so that the visible labels can be distinguished from each other. For example, when viewing a map of an entire country a labels layer that shows labels for smaller towns may have zoom ranges specified so that those labels are not displayed when the view is zoomed out so the entire country is seen. The zoom ranges would be arranged so that as we zoom farther into the map so that only more local regions are in view then labels for smaller towns will be displayed. See the Turning Layers Off/On by Zoom example topic.

 

Note that at some zooms labels may disappear even if a zoom range has not been specified. Labels bound to line objects, for example, will only appear if the line is large enough for the label to fit at the current zoom. As we zoom farther out and lines get smaller, labels bound to those lines will eventually not be able to fit into the smaller space the line occupies on screen.

 

Antialiasing

 

By default, text labels in Manifold are not antialiased. Checking on the Antialias text option in the user interface section of Tools - Options will cause text in labels to be antialiased.

 

When the Antialias lines option is checked (it is on by default) lines, the borders of areas and the borders of text boxes used with labels will be antialiased.

 

Creating Line Labels

 

In addition to the default Insert Label command button shown above, Manifold provides commands to create labels that are aligned to lines.

 

Insert Line Label

images\btn_insert_label_line.gif

Add a text label aligned to the guideline composed of straight line segments that is drawn with the insert tool.

Insert Freeform Line Label

images\btn_insert_label_freeform.gif

Add a text label aligned to the freeform, curved guideline that is drawn with the insert tool.

 

These tools create labels in the shape of a guideline, either a guideline consisting of straight line segments or a more curved, freeform guideline. The line label tools are much less frequently used than the default Insert Label command because the labels they create tend to be useful only at the zoom level at which they were created.

 

Line labels are aligned to a guideline, which is an invisible line to which the label is aligned. If the label is selected for editing by CTRL-Alt clicking on the label, the guideline will become visible.

 

Line labels can only use a plain text style or a halo or shadow style. Line labels using other styles will be rendered as plain text. Line labels can only contain one line of text. If more than one line of text is entered when creating a line label the lines will be concatenated together into a single line of text.

 

Example

 

images\btn_insert_label_line.gif To use the Insert Line Label command, open an unbound labels component and click on the Insert Line Label tool.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_01.gif

 

Click where the guideline is to begin, and then click at the next coordinate of the guideline.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_02.gif

 

Continue clicking at each coordinate defining each guideline segment.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_03.gif

 

Click the coordinate for the end of the line and then right click to end construction of the guideline.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_04.gif

 

The Insert Label dialog will pop up. Enter the text desired for the label and press OK.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_05.gif

 

The new line label will appear.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_06.gif

 

If we unclick the Insert Line Label button (so the mouse is not engaged with that command), we can CTRL-Alt click the newly-created label to select it for editing. That will cause the guideline to appear with edit boxes at the coordinates defining the guideline. We can adjust the shape of the guideline (and thus, the label) by clicking and dragging edit handles. We can move the entire guideline by SHIFT-dragging an edit handle.

 

Note that the label does not occupy the entire guideline. At the zoom in use the default text size is not large enough to fill the entire guideline.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_07.gif

 

If we use the format toolbar to increase the size of the font, we can see that the label expands to use more of the guideline.

 

The size of the label text on the screen will be fixed at the given point size of the font. If we zoom in or out the label text will stay the same size. However, the guideline will appear to be larger or smaller as we zoom in or out because the guideline has a true geographic dimension.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_08.gif

 

For example, suppose we zoom into the view so that the guideline appears larger. The label text stays the same size and will fill less of the guideline. Because label text is centered on the middle of the guideline, the label text will be aligned to only that much of the guideline that extends from the center to the distance required for the text.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_09.gif

 

We can zoom even farther in to see this effect.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_10.gif

 

If we understand how line labels work and we have a label selected for editing so the guideline appears, it is clear how the label automatically aligns to that part of the guideline it occupies at any given zoom level. However, if the label is not selected for editing (the default), it can be disconcerting to see the label change shape as it adapts to an invisible guideline.

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_11.gif

 

For example, if we zoom out the label changes shape…

 

images\eg_insert_line_label_12.gif

 

…and then changes shape yet again as we zoom farther out.

 

Because of the above behavior, line labels are best used at a given zoom. They are normally used to annotate geographic features where a particular zoom will be used for a final view. For example, we might want to create a curved label that follows the arc of a coastline. The label will have a correct appearance at the zoom level in which it was drawn, but zooming in or out will alter the appearance. That doesn't matter if we are composing a map to be seen at a particular zoom.

 

Using the Layers Pane with Labels

 

The Layers pane helps control the appearance of labels within label windows. The layers pane includes checkboxes for two system "layers" - a background color layer and a border layer that shows an enclosing box about the height and width of the label.

 

By default, labels are shown against a white background (or whatever color has been set to be the default background color). Un-checking the Background box will use a checkerboard background pattern. Manifold uses to provide a backdrop for any transparent regions. Checking the Border box in the layers pane will draw a one-pixel border around the height and width of the label. This is a good way to see the actual extent of a label that contains regions of invisible pixels.

 

Note that only maps can have true "layers" in Manifold in the sense that they can layer more than one component within the same map window. The border and background "layers" in the Layers pane for labels are not true layers even though they appear in the Layers pane in the same manner as do layers in maps. These are simply system controls that take advantage of the Layers pane as a conceptually convenient user interface.

 

Layouts and the Layers Pane

 

If a labels component has any Layouts created they will appear as "layers" in the layers pane for that labels component. Checking the box for one of these print layout layers will cause a layout rectangle to appear in the labels window that shows the region covered by the layout.

 

Right clicking onto the hatched border of one of the layout rectangles in the labels window will cause a context menu to appear with controls based on that layout rectangle. For example, we can Zoom to a given layout rectangle, Print it or change its Properties. If a layout is empty (for example, if the layout scope is set to selection and no labels are selected in the parent labels component) zooming to the layout will do nothing.

 

Use Tools - Options - Colors - Layout Rectangle to change the color in which layout rectangles are shown. The default color is black.

 

Advice for New Users

 

Users new to GIS who are familiar with graphics arts editing packages such as Adobe Illustrator are sometimes baffled by the focus of Manifold on automated facilities for the construction of labels. There are several reasons why GIS has evolved a more automated focus on label creation and manipulation than have graphics arts packages:

 

·      GIS is used for much more than static cartography, so it must have capabilities to support those other uses.

·      GIS displays are normally automatically-created, dynamic displays while graphics arts packages are used to create static, predictable compositions.

·      GIS tends to work with immensely larger data sets than do graphics arts packages.

 

Graphics arts professionals new to GIS often do not realize that the usage of GIS packages to create static cartography, that is, to create fixed maps for publication, is but one small part of how GIS packages are used, however important that task may be. If your job has been creating maps with a graphics arts package such as Adobe Illustrator, it is only natural that your first exposure to GIS would arise from such tasks and that your first interest would be in how to use a GIS package to accomplish similar cartographic objectives.

 

However, one reason graphics arts professionals are drawn to GIS is that GIS provides many capabilities, principally those revolving around the tying of database information to geography and geometry, not found in graphics arts packages. The main value of GIS in most applications is the use of visual representations of data, such as maps, to get a handle on complex data relationships that would be very difficult to see by scanning through rows and columns of letters and numbers.

 

Labels play an important role in many such uses, but just as numbers must be automatically computed in spreadsheets for the spreadsheet to work, in GIS applications using visual displays to explore data, labels must pop into existence as needed in the form needed to support such data management.

 

In these and many other uses of GIS the visual display of data in GIS packages is highly dynamic while the purpose of a graphics arts package like Illustrator is to create a single, static composition.

 

Automatic creation and control of label characteristics is very important because many times the projects we create in Manifold will be seen through views that are automatically created and that cannot be predicted in advance. For example, if we create a map with many layers in Manifold and that map is displayed to people through a Manifold Internet Map Server web site, each view seen in that web site will be automatically created depending on how that particular user zooms or pans into the map. In such views labels had better be automatically created, sized and placed so that each view that is created is reasonably attractive and useful for its intended purpose.

 

Even in the simple case of ordinary interactive usage of Manifold, when someone pops a map open on their desktop and then zooms in or out or pans the map to different locations the views will constantly change in terms of zoom level or location. Any labels that are in play must automatically be adapted to the new view for the labels to play their intended role. They must be created or hidden, moved to slightly different locations, change their shape to adapt to a different shape of a line at different zoom level and so on.

 

That's a situation very different from Illustrator or, say, PhotoShop, where we might spend a lot of time getting some graphic image exactly right. But every professional graphics designer who has spent hours of effort on an illustration for a journal article or for an advertisement has done so based on a specific, static understanding of the composition. If the map changed to show different material the composition would also have to change.

 

Finally, the amounts of data encountered in GIS are vastly greater than are used with graphics arts packages. Much GIS data is automatically harvested by satellites and then converted into huge raster and vector data sets, possibly with connections to hundreds of fields of information for each object in the map. A data set representing a world map might contain hundreds of gigabytes of information and even a simple local map might include many thousands of objects and tens of megabytes of data. A GIS working with such data must have the ability to manage large amounts of data to reduce it down to what is of interest.

 

Labels created from such data are best created automatically, since few people are interested in manually sifting through tens of thousands of objects to decide which should be labeled by hand. In fact, automation of such tasks is exactly why a graphics arts professional might be forced to undergo the supremely unpleasant task of learning a new and unfamiliar software package.

 

It is true of course that none of the above points prevent a GIS package from acquiring the facilities for manual graphics arts editing that we take for granted in a package like Illustrator. However, the above factors place the priority of what features are implemented by the GIS vendor more on automated label facilities to support the distinct usages of a GIS package. As time goes on and Manifold continues to evolve, more and more features similar to those in graphics arts packages will be available in addition to those distinctly GIS features already implemented.

 

Users who have strong feelings about desired labels features should visit the Support page on the manifold.net web site and read the link on that page that gives advice on making suggestions and user advocacy and then send in a suggestion for what is desired.

 

Tech Tips

 

Labels components may be copied and pasted as a drawing. The result will be a drawing of points where each point has a "Text" field in the drawing's table that contains the contents of the label text. Copy labels and Paste As a drawing is used in two situations:

 

·      When importing some formats, such as .e00, the result of the import may be a labels component where we would also like to have a drawing showing a point at each label location.

·      Labels components may be exported to AutoCAD DXF format. See the Export Drawing - DXF topic.

·      Copying a labels component and pasting as a drawing is a quick way to move the labels text into a drawing of points that have one text field. Exporting such a drawing might be a useful way of exporting the labels component to a different format. The labels text can be a composite text made up of several different fields, so this is a quick way to capture that text into a single field.

·      For convenience, right clicking on a drawing in the project pane and choosing Create - Labels will launch the Create Labels dialog with that drawing already highlighted in the dialog's Parent pane under the presumption that we would like to create labels for that drawing. To not pre-select a drawing in this way simply right click into the blank region of the project pane when choosing Create - Labels from the context menu, or click anywhere in the blank region of the Create Labels dialog so that no drawing is chosen.

·      By default, Manifold will autoclip labels (not show some labels) to prevent the display from being too crowded with labels. If you add labels and they disappear or some other labels disappear, they are being autoclipped by the overlap resolution algorithm. To turn off autoclipping open the labels component in its own window, choose View - Display Options and un-check the Resolve overlaps box.

·      When using a mouse equipped with a scroll wheel, the scroll wheel zooms in and out of a labels component. Holding the CTRL key down while scrolling will force the zoom to operate near the center of the window.

·      Manifold provides one-step Undo when deleting or duplicating a label or when editing a label metric.

 

See Also

 

Creating Labels from Fields

Synchronized Labels

Formatting Labels

Formatting Individual Labels

Thematic Formatting and Labels

Label Display Options